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Understanding the Legal Context of Obrafour vs Drake Copyright Infringement Lawsuit Accoding To A Legal Expert

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The music industry is no stranger to legal disputes over ownership of intellectual property. Ghanaian rapper, Obrafour, has recently filed a lawsuit against Canadian rapper, Drake, for $10 million, alleging that Drake sampled his song, ‘Oye Ohene’ remix, without permission.

The case has raised questions about the difference between moral and economic rights to a piece of music. In a recent interview with Lawyer Kwabena Mensah, an intellectual property expert, he clarified that the economic right is the right to receive monetary value from the music, while the moral right is the right to be recognized as a contributor to the creation of the work.

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In this particular case, it appears that the artist Mantse Nii Aryeequaye, who claims his voice was sampled on Drake’s ‘Calling My Name’ track, may have the moral right to the music in question, but Obrafour has the economic right. This has led to some confusion about who has the right to file a case in court.

Lawyer Mensah explained that when artists sign with a record label, they often assign their economic rights in exchange for an advance or share of royalties. This means that while they may retain the moral right to the music, the economic right belongs to the label.

In a nutshell, it is important for artists to understand the difference between moral and economic rights of their work. While it may be possible to have one without the other, the ownership of each right can have significant implications for those involved.

It is encouraging to see artists taking their intellectual property rights seriously and seeking legal recourse when necessary. The case of Obrafour vs Drake is just one example of the importance of protecting one’s creative work.

In conclusion, it is important for artists to have a clear understanding of their rights when it comes to their intellectual property. While the issue at hand in the Obrafour vs Drake case is not a clear-cut one, it highlights the importance of being informed and proactive in protecting one’s creative work.

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