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Ministry of Gender sensitizes Ningo-Prampram students on GBV and SRHR

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The Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Protection has organized a sensitization programme on Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and Sexual Reproductive Health Rights (SRHR) for over 75 students from seven schools in the Ningo-Prampram District. The event, which was sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and in collaboration with the Ningo-Prampram District Assembly, aimed to help eliminate the high rate of teenage pregnancies in the district.

According to Madam Matilda Bamfro, Greater Accra Regional Director, Department of Gender, Ningo-Prampram is among the top four districts with high teenage pregnancy cases in the region, hence the focus to help eliminate the problem. She emphasized that continuous engagement with the adolescent would help them gain knowledge to strive towards breaking boundaries in society.

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During the programme, different speakers spoke on various topics, including Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV), which Ms. Eunice Godisson from the Social Welfare Department presented. She defined SGBV as any harmful act that is perpetuated against a person’s will that is based on socially ascribed differences between males and females. She cautioned the students to report any such incidents to the police and said it was inappropriate to perpetuate violence against both girls and boys.

The Principal Nursing Officer of Ningo-Prampram District Health Directorate, Ms. Vivian A. Kpodjah, emphasized that adolescents constituted about 22 percent of Ghana’s total population and needed maximum attention and guidance in decision-making. She encouraged the students to abstain from sex and cautioned them against the challenges both male and female adolescents encounter that make them sensitive to their physical appearance.

Madam Felicity Mawuli Adobe, Girl-Child Education Officer, Ningo-Prampram District, spoke on “The Need for Girls to be in School,” emphasizing that educating the girl-child meant they should be in school at the right time and stay through the academic ladder. She said educating the girl child empowered them to take on a greater economic role in the various communities as well as reduced the gender gap found in schools and workplaces at the national level.

The programme aimed to equip the students with the necessary knowledge and guidance to help eliminate teenage pregnancies, GBV, and other related social issues in their communities.

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