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Menstrual Hygiene: Why Men Should Take an Interest in their Partner’s Menstrual Cycles

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Menstruation is still a taboo topic in many parts of the world, and it’s not often discussed in public or with male partners. However, Derek Tagoe, the Communications and Fundraising Lead for Advancing and Harnessing Opportunities for Youth (AHOY) Africa, has called for men to take an interest in their partner’s menstrual cycle. In a recent interview on Joy Prime’s morning show, Tagoe advised men to participate in discussing menstrual matters and learn about the menstrual cycle of their partners.

By doing so, men can reshape their perceptions about menstruation, remove the veil of silence surrounding the conversation, and help their partners better manage their periods. Menstruation is a natural bodily function, and the involvement of men in the conversation about it can go a long way in breaking down the social stigma attached to it.

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For the most part, men need to recognize that menstruation is a crucial issue that affects their partners, sisters, and daughters. Knowing their partner’s menstrual cycle can enable men to plan their intimate moments, show support, and even purchase sanitary pads for their girlfriends. This level of involvement can erase the notion of uncleanliness associated with periods and promote healthy attitudes towards menstruation.

In Africa, men have more economic power than women. Thus, their involvement in menstrual matters can help reduce period poverty, a severe issue that affects many women and girls on the continent. By removing the veil that covers the whole conversation around menstruation, we can broaden the conversation, change societal attitudes, and combat period poverty.

Inadequate education and awareness about menstruation, particularly among men, is the primary cause of the over 35 percent tax rate on sanitary pads in Africa, according to Derek Tagoe. The involvement of men in menstrual hygiene conversations can help decision-makers understand menstruation better, reduce the tax rate on sanitary pads, and end period poverty.

For the most part, men should take the lead in advocating for menstrual hygiene education in society. The involvement of men in menstrual hygiene conversations can help create a society that is supportive, understanding, and compassionate towards women and girls. Let’s break the silence and work towards ending period poverty in Africa.

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