Advertisement
Advertisement
Ghana News

Ghana’s Poor Performance in World Press Freedom Index Worrying – Ranking MP

Advertisement

Ghana’s poor ranking in the 2022 World Press Freedom Index is a cause for concern, says the Ranking Member of Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs, Samuels Okudzeto Ablakwa. He insists that President Akufo-Addo must take urgent steps to address the issue.

The West African nation has dropped from 60th in 2021 to 62nd globally, and 10th in Africa, marking its lowest-ever ranking in almost two decades. According to Reporters Without Borders, Ghana’s indicative points have dropped from 78.67 percent to 67.43 compared to last year. The US Department of State has also cited Ghana for several human rights abuses, including clamping down on free speech.

Advertisement

Mr. Ablakwa called on the president to address all state agencies involved in protecting media freedoms, including the National Media Commission and all the heads of the various security agencies whose officers have been at the center of the issue. He also urged the president to engage with the press more frequently, as his predecessors had done, to take appropriate questions, understand journalists’ grievances and chart the best way forward.

For the most part, the media plays a crucial role in shaping democracy, providing checks and balances to those in power, and reporting on issues affecting the public. The declining ranking, coupled with the report on human rights abuses, is a worrying development for the country. Ghana has long been considered one of Africa’s democratic success stories, with a vibrant media landscape and a relatively stable political environment. However, recent developments threaten to undermine these achievements and limit the media’s ability to function effectively.

The media is an essential pillar of any democracy, and governments must do everything in their power to ensure that it operates freely and independently. The decline in Ghana’s ranking should serve as a wake-up call to all stakeholders, including the government, civil society, and the media, to work together to address the challenges facing the media industry. Ghana must demonstrate a strong commitment to press freedom and human rights, not just in words but also in action, to maintain its democratic gains and uphold the rule of law.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisement
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker!